Fort Worth, Texas,
09
July
2014
|
11:59 PM
America/Chicago

Spray sunscreen advisory

New report advises against spray lotions for children

Sunscreen should definitely be applied to your children this summer, just don’t use a spray.

That’s the advice from the Food and Drug Administration and Consumer Reports. The FDA has launched an investigation into the potential risks of spray sunscreen.

The concern is that people, especially children, will breathe in the ingredients of the sunscreen. Consumer Reports followed the report by asking that spray sunscreen “should generally not be used by or on children.”

Justin Smith, M.D., a Cook Children’s pediatrician, understands the thought process of this call to action. Dr. Smith says children with asthma may be at greater risk by breathing in the ingredients in the sunscreen.

"Any aerosol product that forms a spray makes particles small enough to get into the lungs if inhaled,” Dr. Smith said. “For some children, this could cause irritation that could lead to difficulty breathing. It is especially important to be cautious in children with asthma and other problems with their lungs."

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