Fort Worth, Texas,
23
May
2019
|
09:45 PM
America/Chicago

Tarrant County Public Health Confirms Possible Measles Exposure at DFW Airport

Tarrant County Public Health has confirmed a traveler passing through DFW Airport on a May 15, 2019, connecting flight has tested positive for measles.

TCPH wants the traveling public to be aware that exposures may have occurred at DFW Airport on May 15 in the following areas:

  • Terminal D customs area from 5:15 to 7:45 p.m.
  • The Skylink (i.e., tram between terminals) from 5:45 to 8 p.m.
  • Terminal A in the area of gate 8 from 6 to 10:50 p.m.

People who were in the areas listed above are asked to watch for any symptoms until June 5, 2019. Measles is an airborne disease spread by coughing and sneezing. It causes a reddish rash, high fever, cough, runny nose and watery eyes. It usually lasts one to two weeks. The rash begins on the face and head and then proceeds downward and outward to the hands and feet. It fades in the same order it began, from head to feet.

Travelers who are flying internationally or to sites of active outbreaks are advised to follow these guidelines:

  • Infants 6 months through 11 months of age should receive one dose of MMR vaccine.
  • Children 12 months of age and older should receive two doses of MMR vaccine separated by at least 28 days.
  • Adults should be sure they have had at least two doses of MMR vaccine.

Most people born in 1957 or after should have documentation of at least one dose of MMR (Measles, Mumps and Rubella) vaccine or other evidence of immunity to measles. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends two doses of the vaccine.

For children, the first dose should be given at 12 months of age and the second between the ages of 4 to 6 years.

“Vaccination is still the most important thing you can do to protect your child against measles. If you have concerns you, or your child, may have the measles or been exposed to the measles, please call your doctor immediately and try not to come in contact with others,” said Justin Smith, a Cook Children’s pediatrician. “The MMR vaccine is safe and very effective at preventing measles. If you or your child has not had the vaccination, please call your doctor to arrange this as soon as possible.”

Click here to read the release from Tarrant County Public Health.

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