Fort Worth, Texas,
01
April
2014
|
09:30 PM
America/Chicago

Drop it like it’s hot – your child’s fever/pain relievers

It’s definitely flu season! We are also seeing a lot of viruses with higher temperatures. Let’s talk fever reducers/pain relievers.

  •  Two kinds of fever reducers are approved for children — Acetaminophen and Ibuprofen. Aspirin SHOULD NOT be given to children as it can cause a serious illness called Reye syndrome.Ibuprofen can be used AFTER 6 months of age.KNOW THE PROPER DOSE.In Pediatrics these medications are based on your child’s weight. If you are not sure of the dose ask us or the pharmacist.MEASURE ACCURATELYUse only the dosing device that comes with your medication

    DO NOT GIVE ANOTHER DOSE TOO SOONRead the label on your medication to make sure you know how often to give it. Make sure all adults in the household know when a medicine is given so we don’t accidentally re-dose.

    It’s a good idea to keep a log and write down the medicine and when you gave it. This way Mommy doesn’t accidentally give a dose when Daddy just did. We see this over sight all the time so be aware.

  • If your child is under 2 months and has temp more than 100.4 F rectally, they need to be seen either in our office or the emergency department.
  • If your child is under 24 months and has a fever more than 102 F for over 24 hours, they need to be seen in the office.
  • If your  child is older than 24 months and has fever present for over 72 hours you should be seen by your pediatrician
  • If your child’s temperature IS NOT responding to fever reducers let your pediatrician know. They may need to be seen.WE DO NOT RECOMMEND ALTERNATING ACETAMINOPHEN AND IBUPROFEN. This practice has NEVER been recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and may result in confusion and dosing errors.You can also try lukewarm baths, but do not use cold baths or alcohol baths as this may make your child shiver which will raise their temperature.

    If your child is vomiting and can’t keep Tylenol down you can try Feverall (acetaminophen) suppositories.

Sandra Peak, M.D., joined Cook Childrens Physician Network in Lewisville in 2004. Dr. Peak enjoys gardening, yoga, and boating and in her spare time can be found at the lake with her husband Jay, stepson Sage and the world’s most amazing Lab, Sugar Mae.

About the author

By Sandra C. Peak, MD
Dr. Peak attended Baylor University and received a B.A. in English and Psychology. She attended medical school at University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio. Her Pediatric Residency was at Arkansas Childrens Hospital in Little Rock where she participated in Angel One emergency helicopter transport service and where she received the Jocelyn Elders Award for excellence in community service. She returned to her home town of Dallas in 1998 and established a Pediatric Practice in Carrollton, Texas. She joined Cook Childrens Physician Network in Lewisville in 2004. Dr. Peak enjoys gardening, yoga, and boating and in her spare time can be found at the lake with her husband Jay, stepson Sage and the world's most amazing Lab, Sugar Mae.

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