19
May
2016
|
04:00 PM
America/Chicago

How do we break down silos for innovative design?

Episode 5: Pediatric Leadership: The New Medicine Podcast

I enjoy team building. I have done that throughout my career…This team was unique because there are constant moving pieces.
Warren Marks, M.D.

Today's guest on Pediatric Leadership: The New Medicine Podcast is Warren Marks, M.D., a neurologist and medical director of the Movement Disorders and Rehabilitation Programs at Cook Children’s.

How do we break down silos for innovative design?

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Innovative ideas often require a team approach. It’s difficult to make changes that truly move the needle when you consider a problem from just one perspective. Broadening the team allows physicians to consider other ideas. These new ideas might just open up possibilities that they may have never thought of.

Dr. Marks is a pediatric neurologist with Cook Children’s in Fort Worth, Texas. He has a particular interest in movement disorders and has been involved in Cook Children’s effort to advance the use of deep brain stimulation in the pediatric population. His latest project has been the design and implementation of an innovative pediatric motion lab, which uses a multidisciplinary approach, and advanced technology to assess and develop plans for children, teens and young adults with movement disorders.

Questions to work through on today's topic:

  • How are things going with the new lab?
  • Going back to when it started. Walk us through some of the different professionals who had input on the design of the lab. How did each member of the team contribute to the big picture?
  • What were some of the challenges associated with having a big/diverse team?
  • What’s next on the horizon for the lab?
  • What part of your work are you most proud of?
  • What is the most important quality for a leader in pediatrics?

Quotes:

In order to develop a lab like this, it takes a lot of people who have a great deal of understanding about all the components.

The most important people are the physical therapists who run the lab every day.

The technology itself is just to tool but it does allow for better procedures and better outcomes.

I enjoy team building. I have done that throughout my career…This team was unique because there are constant moving pieces.

There is a huge need to study how childhood obesity affects movement…it should allow us to intervene and better understand what we are doing.

All the things that I have done have required teams.

Neurologists, orthopedists and neurosurgeons desperately need each other.

At the end of the day, we are all in this to help the patient and to make their life better.

I think it is important to surround yourself with good people…and allow them to be creative.

Re: Good ideas-This is not about ownership, it’s about outcome.

Before we see a kid from far away, we do a lot of pre-screening via video and questionnaires.

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